Show Racism the Red Card Become Partners With the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are proud to have ‘Show Racism the Red Card’ as our partners in the No2H8 Crime Awards. They are one of the leading anti-racism educational charities in the UK which was established in January 1996. The organisation utilises the high-profile status of football and football players to help tackle racism in society. The majority of the organisation’s work is the delivery of education to young people and adults in their schools, their workplaces and at events held in football stadiums. Across Britain, Show Racism the Red Card delivers training to more than 50,000 individuals per year.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive and much needed annual event?

Because there is a rise in hate crimes in the UK, more needs to be done on it. Hate crime is massively unreported. For example, Show Racism the Red Card research shows that only around 10% of hate crimes is reported to the police. So therefore, we think No2H8 Crime Awards are a great way to get more people involved in reporting hate crime.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

Show Racism the Red Card and many other organisations have evidence that it is certainly rising.

  • How important is education in tackling hate crimes?

If we want to reduce hate crime in the long-term, education is key to do so. The ethos of our organisation is that no one is born racist, people learn to be racist and if you can learn to be racist you can also unlearn it.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

Everyone wants to live in a peaceful society, where everyone can go about their everyday life without harassment and therefore we need to be proactive in fighting hate crimes, put more effort into educating people and organise events such as No2H8 Crime Awards.

The Anti-Bullying Alliance Partners with the No2H8 Crime Awards

Another organisation that we have partnered with on the No2H8 Crime Awards is the Anti-Bullying Alliance. It is a unique coalition of organisations and individuals, working together on preventing bullying and creating safer environments in which children and young people can live, grow, play and learn. The Anti-Bullying Alliance was established by the NSPCC and the National Children’s Bureau and they offer expertise in relation to all forms of bullying between children and young people.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

It draws attention to the issue of hate crime from a positive angle that celebrate those who challenge this behaviour. We hope this will in turn encourage people to report hate crime and hate incidents and prevent hate crimes happening in the future. Our collective power all saying ‘no, we will not stand for this and here is what you can do’ will empower others. We have collective power and responsibility to make sure we create a community where we have equal rights and equal respect.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

From our perspective of working with schools, we know that headway has been made over the past couple of decades to reduce hate speech in the classroom. However, recently there have been several reports that show a sharp rise in hate crimes and incidents in schools and these figures back up what we have been hearing from schools in recent years. The Anti-Bullying Alliance wants to see more awareness and support for schools on challenging discriminatory language and hate crimes and incidents in school.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

At the Anti-Bullying Alliance, our tagline is ‘United Against Bullying’. As a membership organisation ourselves, we constantly see the greater value and impact of working collaboratively. Working together means that voices from across communities are heard, messages are amplified. And ultimately that means that change can take place.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

We know the power for in instances of bullying of a bystander speaking up. Research in the USA in the noughties showed that in 90% of bullying situations, where a bystander [someone who sees but is not directly involved in bullying] just says ‘no’ to the situation and voices their dislike, the bullying stops. This shows the power we have to stop hate and prejudice.

The theme for this year’s Anti-Bullying Week is “All Different, All Equal”. Young people told us that their top concerns were about bullying related to differences – that of race, faith, disability, and sexuality and gender. It’s clear that they recognise negative discourse around them, but they want this to change. At a time of division, young people are telling us that they would like us to focus on the positive aspects of difference, and on finding out what links people from different walks of life.

We want to support communities to celebrate what makes them, and others, unique and help them understand why it’s important that every child feels included and is able to be themselves without fear.

Wandsworth & Westminster MIND Support the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are honoured to partner on the No2H8 Crime Awards with Wandsworth & Westminster Mind. They have been delivering services and support for people living in Wandsworth and Westminster and in neighbouring boroughs for over 40 years. Their aim is to help people in local communities to have better mental health and well-being and to live the best lives possible.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

The No2H8 Awards are a positive event as they raise awareness about hate crimes in our community and bring together people who work tirelessly to decrease and ultimately eradicate this problem.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

Working together helps us by pooling information, expertise and resources as we do through CATCH (Community Alliance to Combat Hate) project.

In addition, by working together, we give a clear message that we will continue to bring people who represent diverse communities together. We give a message that we work together to facilitate harmony, understanding, mutual respect and dialogue, by emphasizing the common values of different cultures and religions. Our message is that we enjoy our differences, while respecting the others.

  • What is the main difficulty with tackling disability and mental health hate crimes?

The main difficulty has been impact of disability and mental health on people’s ability and willingness to pursue their achievable goals and cases as far as a complaint to the Police and subsequent possible prosecutions.

In addition to this, further detrimental impact on people’s mental health and increased vulnerability that limits willingness and ability to join services in community.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

To continue to raise awareness of the existence of the hate crime problem and of the necessity to overcome it.  While it is encouraging that people are more confident in coming forward to report hate crimes and that attitudes are changing for the better, even one hate crime is one too many.

‘Kick It Out’ Highlight Why They Are Part of the No2H8 Crime Annual Awards

We are honoured to have ‘Kick It Out’ as one of our partners for No2H8 Crime Awards. ‘Kick It Out’ is an organisation working on equality and inclusion through the medium of football. It also works within the educational sector to challenge discrimination, encourage inclusive practices and campaign for positive change.

  • Why do you think the No2H8 Crime Awards are a positive annual event?

‘Kick It Out’ believes that it is important to recognise the groups and individuals who take a stand against hate crime and promote messages of unity and inclusion within their communities.

Therefore, the National No2H8 Crime Awards are an essential mechanism to display the support for groups and individuals who challenge hate, but to also inspire others to recognise and promote diversity and inclusion within their local community.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

‘Kick It Out’ is aware of the many pieces of research which have indicated that hatred and intolerance are on the rise in the United Kingdom. In recognition of this, ‘Kick It Out’ launched a season long initiative called ‘Call Full Time On Hate’ which raised awareness of hate entering the game as well as promoting the inclusive work football and clubs are doing.

We believe that the only way to combat hate is to continually promote the good work being done to promote inclusion, as well as highlight areas of discrimination which need to be challenged.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

It is essential that groups continue to work together to share experiences of hate crime across the country.

Through shared experiences, we can find common ground on what is the best practices with dealing with hate as well as encouraging a warm and welcoming environment for people for all walks of life.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

As we have seen in recent times, it is vital that communities remain united so they can remain vigilant against all prejudice which may occur within their environment.

It is the same for football where ‘Kick It Out’, alongside the football authorities, must stay vigilant to any discrimination which rises in the stands or in the grassroots game.

Huffington Post & Jewish News – Media Partners for the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are proud to announce the media partnership of the Huffington Post and the Jewish News with the No2H8 Crime Awards which will be taking place in October.

Both media partners will be highlighting award winners and the No2H8 Crime Awards now has 16 national partners who are supporting this annual event to honour those individuals and organisations working against hatred, intolerance and prejudice.

Both the Huffington Post and the Jewish News will also be attending the evening of the awards and over 200 people are expected to attend and celebrate award nominees and those who are successful in being honoured with an award.

Lastly, the Judging Panel will be meeting in the next few weeks to sift through the numerous public nominations that we have received.

Adrian Chiles, Presenting the No2H8 Crime Awards in October

We are pleased to announce that British TV and radio presenter, Adrian Chiles will be compering on the night for the annual #No2H8 Crime awards.

Adrian Chiles began his television and broadcasting career with a three week work experience stint at the BBC.  He can now count more than 20 years in the industry with highlights including his award winning BBC Radio Five Live programme, Chiles on Saturday, BBC TV’s Working LunchThe Apprentice:  You’re FiredMOTD2 and The One Show, and ITV’s Daybreak and football coverage.  In recent productions for the BBC, he explored his own and others’ faith in a three part series, My Mediterranean;  went back to his roots for Panorama to discover why Britain voted for Brexit;  and looked back at an extraordinary game of football in BBC 2’s Whites vs Blacks:  How Football Changed a Nation.  He can be heard regularly on BBC Radio Five where he presents Five Live Dailytwo days a week.

We are honoured to have Adrian on the night with us for what will be a celebration of the vast amount of volunteering and work that takes place in communities to counter hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

Member of the public and organisations can make nominations through the following LINK.

Judging Panel for the #No2H8 Crime National Awards Comes Together

We are pleased to announce the first appointments for the Judging Panel for the #No2H8 Crime National Awards. The appointments include:

Nazir Afzal OBE: Mr Nazir Afzal OBE is Chief Executive of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners. Nazir became Chief Crown Prosecutor for North West England in 2011 leading teams responsible for some of the highest profile cases in the country, including the child grooming case in Rochdale and the prosecution of Stuart Hall.

Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE, QC: Alex Carlile was born in Wales in 1948. After education at Epsom College he graduated LLB AKC at King’s College London. Lord Carlile was called to the Bar by Gray’s Inn (where he is now a Bencher) in 1970 and became a Q.C. in 1984, at the age of 36. Until 2009 he was the Honorary Recorder of the City of Hereford. He sits as a Recorder of the Crown Court, as a Deputy High Court Judge, and as a Chairman of the Competition Appeal Tribunal. Between 2001-2011, he was the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation; the Independent Reviewer of the Government’s new PREVENT policy and remains the independent reviewer of National Security policy in Northern Ireland.

Canon Mark Oakley: Canon Oakley was born in Shrewsbury in 1968 and was educated in London and Oxford. He was ordained at St Paul’s in 1993 and served his first appointment as Curate of St John’s Wood Church (1993-6). He was then asked to become the Chaplain to the Bishop of London (1996-2000) and was later appointed Rector of St Paul’s, Covent Garden, known as “the Actors’ church” (2000-5). He was also Chaplain at RADA from 2003 to 2005. He was subsequently invited to take up appointment as Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe, based in Copenhagen. Canon Oakley returned to London in 2008 and served at Grosvenor Chapel, Mayfair, before being appointed to St Paul’s. He is also a Deputy Priest in Ordinary to HM the Queen (1996-). Canon Oakley’s interests are the relationship between faith and poetry, human rights and the place of faith in the contemporary world. He is the author of several books and is a regular lecturer and broadcaster.

Baroness Neuberger DBE: Baroness Neuberger DBE was educated at Newnham College, Cambridge and Leo Baeck College, London.

She became a rabbi in 1977, and served the South London Liberal Synagogue for twelve years, before going to the King’s Fund Institute as a Visiting Fellow. She was at Harvard Medical School in 1991-1992, Chairman of Camden & Islington Community Health Services NHS Trust from 1993 until 1997 and then Chief Executive of the King’s Fund, an independent health charity until 2004. She has been a member of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, the Medical Research Council and the General Medical Council, a Trustee of the Runnymede Trust and the Imperial War Museum (until 2006).

She was created a Life Peer in June 2004 (Liberal Democrat) and was  Bloomberg Professor of Divinity at Harvard University for the Spring Semester 2006.

Further appointments will be announced soon.

Opening Nominations for the #No2H8Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017

We are opening nominations for the national #No2H8 Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017. This will be the second year where we will be recognising many of the unsung heroes who work tirelessly and diligently in communities tackling hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

This year, the #No2H8 Crime Awards will host a gala dinner in London for participants and for nominees. This expands our work from last year and we have a number of high profile individuals who will be part of the Judging Panel for the awards and who will also speak at the gala dinner. Last year, the awards attracted the Under-Secretary of State for the Department for Communities and Local Government, Lord Nick Bourne and Home Office Minister, Baron Susan Williams.

If you know of an individual, organisation, Parliamentarian or social activist who has made a real difference in their local area tackling hatred, racism and prejudice, you can lodge a nomination on the #No2H8 Crime Awards site. 1st of May is the date to remember and let’s ensure that we put hate crime on the political and social map as much as possible.

Richard Benson Appointed to Chair the National #No2H8 Crime Awards

We are very pleased to announce the appointment of ex-CST Chief Executive, Richard Benson, as the Chair of the national #No2H8 Crime Awards which will be taking place in October 2017. This is an ongoing appointment and we welcome the expertise on offer through this appointment.

Following on from the successful launch of the anti-Hate Crime Awards in 2016 which attracted over 40 organisations and over 300 people, Faith Matters is proud to announce the appointment of Richard Benson as the Chair of the national awards scheme for 2017. Themed as ‘Communities Countering Hatred‘ the national awards scheme will celebrate and honour those civil society activists, religious leaders, organisations and politicians who have inspired others and worked to reduce hatred, intolerance and prejudice in their local communities.
 
This initiative is the only national awards ceremony which ensures that those working in the fields of hate crime monitoring, community cohesion and integration are honoured in the United Kingdom. The scheme therefore covers England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In 2017, there will be over 15 categories of nominations celebrating the work of young people through to organisations and faith leaders and at a time of global change and insecurity, the awards are also meant to provide a focal point to mobilise and motivate communities to be ‘Upstanders’ against hatred within communities.
 
Speaking about his appointment as Chair of the national awards scheme, the ex-CEO of the Community Security Trust, Richard Benson, said:
“I have devoted over 20 years of my professional and private life to combating anti-semitism and all forms of hate crimes and have worked with amazing people and organisations who are at the sharp end of countering the same issues. They stand up for what’s right and with so much intolerance and hatred these brave people need to be honoured openly and proudly for what they do”.