The Anti-Bullying Alliance Partners with the No2H8 Crime Awards

Another organisation that we have partnered with on the No2H8 Crime Awards is the Anti-Bullying Alliance. It is a unique coalition of organisations and individuals, working together on preventing bullying and creating safer environments in which children and young people can live, grow, play and learn. The Anti-Bullying Alliance was established by the NSPCC and the National Children’s Bureau and they offer expertise in relation to all forms of bullying between children and young people.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

It draws attention to the issue of hate crime from a positive angle that celebrate those who challenge this behaviour. We hope this will in turn encourage people to report hate crime and hate incidents and prevent hate crimes happening in the future. Our collective power all saying ‘no, we will not stand for this and here is what you can do’ will empower others. We have collective power and responsibility to make sure we create a community where we have equal rights and equal respect.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

From our perspective of working with schools, we know that headway has been made over the past couple of decades to reduce hate speech in the classroom. However, recently there have been several reports that show a sharp rise in hate crimes and incidents in schools and these figures back up what we have been hearing from schools in recent years. The Anti-Bullying Alliance wants to see more awareness and support for schools on challenging discriminatory language and hate crimes and incidents in school.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

At the Anti-Bullying Alliance, our tagline is ‘United Against Bullying’. As a membership organisation ourselves, we constantly see the greater value and impact of working collaboratively. Working together means that voices from across communities are heard, messages are amplified. And ultimately that means that change can take place.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

We know the power for in instances of bullying of a bystander speaking up. Research in the USA in the noughties showed that in 90% of bullying situations, where a bystander [someone who sees but is not directly involved in bullying] just says ‘no’ to the situation and voices their dislike, the bullying stops. This shows the power we have to stop hate and prejudice.

The theme for this year’s Anti-Bullying Week is “All Different, All Equal”. Young people told us that their top concerns were about bullying related to differences – that of race, faith, disability, and sexuality and gender. It’s clear that they recognise negative discourse around them, but they want this to change. At a time of division, young people are telling us that they would like us to focus on the positive aspects of difference, and on finding out what links people from different walks of life.

We want to support communities to celebrate what makes them, and others, unique and help them understand why it’s important that every child feels included and is able to be themselves without fear.

‘Kick It Out’ Highlight Why They Are Part of the No2H8 Crime Annual Awards

We are honoured to have ‘Kick It Out’ as one of our partners for No2H8 Crime Awards. ‘Kick It Out’ is an organisation working on equality and inclusion through the medium of football. It also works within the educational sector to challenge discrimination, encourage inclusive practices and campaign for positive change.

  • Why do you think the No2H8 Crime Awards are a positive annual event?

‘Kick It Out’ believes that it is important to recognise the groups and individuals who take a stand against hate crime and promote messages of unity and inclusion within their communities.

Therefore, the National No2H8 Crime Awards are an essential mechanism to display the support for groups and individuals who challenge hate, but to also inspire others to recognise and promote diversity and inclusion within their local community.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

‘Kick It Out’ is aware of the many pieces of research which have indicated that hatred and intolerance are on the rise in the United Kingdom. In recognition of this, ‘Kick It Out’ launched a season long initiative called ‘Call Full Time On Hate’ which raised awareness of hate entering the game as well as promoting the inclusive work football and clubs are doing.

We believe that the only way to combat hate is to continually promote the good work being done to promote inclusion, as well as highlight areas of discrimination which need to be challenged.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

It is essential that groups continue to work together to share experiences of hate crime across the country.

Through shared experiences, we can find common ground on what is the best practices with dealing with hate as well as encouraging a warm and welcoming environment for people for all walks of life.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

As we have seen in recent times, it is vital that communities remain united so they can remain vigilant against all prejudice which may occur within their environment.

It is the same for football where ‘Kick It Out’, alongside the football authorities, must stay vigilant to any discrimination which rises in the stands or in the grassroots game.