The Mirror Newspaper Partners with the Annual No2H8 Awards

We are proud to announce the Mirror as the official media partner of the No2H8 Crime Awards 2018.

The Mirror has a long and proud history for calling out racism and intolerance right across society. They stand up for what is right and give a voice to those who need it most.

With incidents of hate crimes on the rise and antisemitic and anti-Muslim hatred being felt across the UK, we are proud to partner with the Mirror and to defend the right for people to live their lives without fear and to identify and be proud of who they are. The No2H8 Crime Awards have become the annual event to celebrate all that is good in our country and to ensure that decency, respect and tolerance for others are at the heart of our communities.

The third No2H8 Crime Awards will take place on Thursday 13th September honouring those who stand against hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

Nominations will open in July and anyone can nominate someone who has challenged hatred throughout the country, and made a positive impact in their community and stood up to prejudice and intolerance.

Previous winners of the No2H8 Crime Awards include medical specialist Dr Nasser Kurdy who was stabbed in the neck outside of the Altrincham mosque in September 2017 and helped those injured in the Manchester Arena bomb.  

Other winners include Jack Stanley who was awarded the Young Upstander Award. Jack, 13, was featured on the national documentary ‘Educating Manchester’, where Jack comforted and made friends with Syrian refugee Rani Assad who was bullied at school. His actions led to the national hashtag #BeMoreLikeJack trending on Twitter.

Speaking about this important and exciting national media partnership, the Chair of the No2H8 Crime Awards, Richard Benson OBE, said:

“We are proud to partner with the Mirror ensuring that people across the country can nominate men, women; young people and statutory authorities for the No2H8 Crime Awards.

“This partnership not only widens the engagement of the Awards across the country, it also places this national unique event on the map as a means of celebrating all that is good within communities and where people selflessly stand up against hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

“We need to celebrate this distinctive characteristic of our country and also motivate people to be Upstanders for others if they are targeted with hatred and bigotry. We look forward to delivering our largest No2H8 Crime Awards in 2018 and with the Mirror, we go from strength to strength.”

 Alison Phillips, Daily Mirror Editor said:

“Racism and prejudice have no place in our society and the Mirror has a proud history for standing up for what is right.

“We are excited to work with the No2H8 Crime Awards, honouring those who help to stamp out hate crimes in their community and refusing to accept any sort of prejudice or intolerance.”

Speaking on behalf of the Jewish News which has supported the No2H8 Crime Awards since its inception, Jewish News editor Richard Ferrer said: “It’s a great honour to once again to be working with such a group of highly-respected organisations battling hatred and intolerance across our country.”

The No2H8 Crime Awards would like to thank the founding media partners, the Jewish News, who supported the Awards right from the start of the inception. This relationship and partnership continues and we would especially like to thank Richard Ferrer, the Editor of the Jewish News and Justin Cohen, the News Editor of the Jewish News. Both of these individuals have helped to develop and shape these Awards and we would like to thank them for their enormous efforts. We hope that you may support the Jewish News and their visionary community journalism in the future.

Nominees for the 2017 No2H8 Crime Awards Announced

We are pleased to announce the list of nominees for the award categories for the 2017 No2H8 Crime Awards.

Nominees have been through 2 judging panels, including hate crime agencies and a panel of respected peers who have spent many years countering hatred, racism, prejudice and extremism. We are therefore pleased to announce the following list of nominees.

We would like to send our congratulations to those on the list and to those who did not make the list, we hope that 2018 will be your year!

Upstanding Organisation Award

Liverpool Homeless Football Club
The Naz and Matt Foundation
Sophie Lancaster Foundation
Stand Against Racism and Inequality (SARI)

Community Volunteer Upstander Award

John Conibear
Farooq Aftab
Roanna Carleton-Taylor

Young Upstander Award

Jack Stanley

Upstanding Research and Innovation Award

Dr Mark Walters
Dr Kim Sadique
Dr Imran Awan

Law Enforcement Upstander Award

Michael Cronin
Northumbria Police Community Engagement Team
Michelle Redfern

The Jo Cox Award

Sylvia Lancaster
Stop Funding Hate

Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr Edie Friedman
Professor John Grieve CBE QPM
Dr David Hoffman

The CPS ‘Supporting Victims, Reporting Hate Crime ‘Award

Derby Homes
Emma Roebuck
National Black Crown Prosecution Association

Outstanding Contribution Award

Mehri Niknam
Detective Chief Inspector Shabnam Chaudhri
Sally Sealey OBE

Sheikh Abdullah Award for Intercultural Dialogue

Dr Imam Mamadou Bocoum
Rabbi Jonathon Wittenberg

The Anti-Bullying Alliance Partners with the No2H8 Crime Awards

Another organisation that we have partnered with on the No2H8 Crime Awards is the Anti-Bullying Alliance. It is a unique coalition of organisations and individuals, working together on preventing bullying and creating safer environments in which children and young people can live, grow, play and learn. The Anti-Bullying Alliance was established by the NSPCC and the National Children’s Bureau and they offer expertise in relation to all forms of bullying between children and young people.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

It draws attention to the issue of hate crime from a positive angle that celebrate those who challenge this behaviour. We hope this will in turn encourage people to report hate crime and hate incidents and prevent hate crimes happening in the future. Our collective power all saying ‘no, we will not stand for this and here is what you can do’ will empower others. We have collective power and responsibility to make sure we create a community where we have equal rights and equal respect.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

From our perspective of working with schools, we know that headway has been made over the past couple of decades to reduce hate speech in the classroom. However, recently there have been several reports that show a sharp rise in hate crimes and incidents in schools and these figures back up what we have been hearing from schools in recent years. The Anti-Bullying Alliance wants to see more awareness and support for schools on challenging discriminatory language and hate crimes and incidents in school.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

At the Anti-Bullying Alliance, our tagline is ‘United Against Bullying’. As a membership organisation ourselves, we constantly see the greater value and impact of working collaboratively. Working together means that voices from across communities are heard, messages are amplified. And ultimately that means that change can take place.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

We know the power for in instances of bullying of a bystander speaking up. Research in the USA in the noughties showed that in 90% of bullying situations, where a bystander [someone who sees but is not directly involved in bullying] just says ‘no’ to the situation and voices their dislike, the bullying stops. This shows the power we have to stop hate and prejudice.

The theme for this year’s Anti-Bullying Week is “All Different, All Equal”. Young people told us that their top concerns were about bullying related to differences – that of race, faith, disability, and sexuality and gender. It’s clear that they recognise negative discourse around them, but they want this to change. At a time of division, young people are telling us that they would like us to focus on the positive aspects of difference, and on finding out what links people from different walks of life.

We want to support communities to celebrate what makes them, and others, unique and help them understand why it’s important that every child feels included and is able to be themselves without fear.

Opening Nominations for the #No2H8Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017

We are opening nominations for the national #No2H8 Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017. This will be the second year where we will be recognising many of the unsung heroes who work tirelessly and diligently in communities tackling hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

This year, the #No2H8 Crime Awards will host a gala dinner in London for participants and for nominees. This expands our work from last year and we have a number of high profile individuals who will be part of the Judging Panel for the awards and who will also speak at the gala dinner. Last year, the awards attracted the Under-Secretary of State for the Department for Communities and Local Government, Lord Nick Bourne and Home Office Minister, Baron Susan Williams.

If you know of an individual, organisation, Parliamentarian or social activist who has made a real difference in their local area tackling hatred, racism and prejudice, you can lodge a nomination on the #No2H8 Crime Awards site. 1st of May is the date to remember and let’s ensure that we put hate crime on the political and social map as much as possible.