List of Award Winners for the No2H8 Crime Awards – 2017

Congratulations to all of those who were successful on the night on the No2H8 Crime Awards. These are the list of winners and to those who were runners up, there is always next year. Nominations for 2018 will be opening soon.

Public Sector Upstander Award

Dr Nasser Kurdy

The CPS Special Award

Emma Roebuck

Community Volunteer Upstander

Farooq Aftab

Young Upstander

Jack Stanley

Law Enforcement Upstander

Northumbria Police Community Engagement Team

Upstanding Research and Innovation Award

Kim Sadique
Outstanding Contribution Award

Detective Chief Inspector Shabnam Chaudhri – Metropolitan Police Service

Upstanding Organisation

The Sophie Lancaster Foundation

The Jo Cox Award

Stop Funding Hate

Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr David Hoffman

Sheikh Abdullah Award for Intercultural Dialogue

Dr Imam Mamadou Bocoum and Rabbi Jonathon Wittenberg

Tell MAMA Champion Award

Stephen Brookes MBE

James Edgington & Mark Greary

Nominees for the 2017 No2H8 Crime Awards Announced

We are pleased to announce the list of nominees for the award categories for the 2017 No2H8 Crime Awards.

Nominees have been through 2 judging panels, including hate crime agencies and a panel of respected peers who have spent many years countering hatred, racism, prejudice and extremism. We are therefore pleased to announce the following list of nominees.

We would like to send our congratulations to those on the list and to those who did not make the list, we hope that 2018 will be your year!

Upstanding Organisation Award

Liverpool Homeless Football Club
The Naz and Matt Foundation
Sophie Lancaster Foundation
Stand Against Racism and Inequality (SARI)

Community Volunteer Upstander Award

John Conibear
Farooq Aftab
Roanna Carleton-Taylor

Young Upstander Award

Jack Stanley

Upstanding Research and Innovation Award

Dr Mark Walters
Dr Kim Sadique
Dr Imran Awan

Law Enforcement Upstander Award

Michael Cronin
Northumbria Police Community Engagement Team
Michelle Redfern

The Jo Cox Award

Sylvia Lancaster
Stop Funding Hate

Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr Edie Friedman
Professor John Grieve CBE QPM
Dr David Hoffman

The CPS ‘Supporting Victims, Reporting Hate Crime ‘Award

Derby Homes
Emma Roebuck
National Black Crown Prosecution Association

Outstanding Contribution Award

Mehri Niknam
Detective Chief Inspector Shabnam Chaudhri
Sally Sealey OBE

Sheikh Abdullah Award for Intercultural Dialogue

Dr Imam Mamadou Bocoum
Rabbi Jonathon Wittenberg

Stop Funding Hate Partners with the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are honoured to have Stop Funding Hate as our partners. Stop Funding Hate aims to tackle the culture of hate and demonisation that is dividing our society and contributing to hate crimes. They are taking on the divisive hate campaigns of some press sources, by persuading advertisers to pull their support. Hundreds of thousands of people have now taken action to persuade companies to stop funding hate. In November 2016, Lego announced they would no longer be advertising in one of the national papers that Stop Funding Hate campaigns against.

Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

All around the UK people are tackling hatred within their communities and supporting neighbours, friends and colleagues who have faced abuse. This deserves to be recognised and supported. Because ultimately it is through people engaging with each other at the community level that we can overcome hatred and prejudice.

 This event is also a valuable opportunity for communities to show unity against all forms of hate and discrimination. Whether it is anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, or other hatred based on race, religion, sexuality, disability, gender or cultural identity, we are standing together to support all those challenging prejudice and working for a kinder, fairer society.

Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

The past year has seen a shocking rise in hate crime and a resurgence of racism on a scale many would have believed impossible not long ago. But what’s encouraging is that across the UK – and around the world – hundreds of thousands of people have been getting organised and pushing back.

The rise of hatred and intolerance has been met by a growing global movement that is challenging the normalisation of hate and insisting on a more civil public discourse. Now is the time for everyone who believes in fairness, neighbourliness and basic human rights to speak out and show that the vast majority want to live in a society where everyone is respected.

How important is the media in raising awareness about hate crimes?

The media is hugely important in facilitating frank and honest debate about the factors fuelling hate crime – and enabling those affected to have their voices heard. Alongside this, the advertisers who fund our media have a vital role in supporting media outlets that report accurately and fairly – and ensuring that their marketing budgets do not fund publications which are themselves inciting hatred.

Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

History shows us the dangers of allowing hatred, intolerance and prejudice to go unchallenged. If we look the other way while people within our community are demonised and attacked simply because of who they are, this behaviour can start to become a new “norm” and get progressively more extreme. Hate speech and hate crime can be the first steps on a path that leads to large-scale discrimination and violence. We have to send a clear signal from the outset that we refuse to be divided and will not allow anyone in our community to be treated this way.

Show Racism the Red Card Become Partners With the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are proud to have ‘Show Racism the Red Card’ as our partners in the No2H8 Crime Awards. They are one of the leading anti-racism educational charities in the UK which was established in January 1996. The organisation utilises the high-profile status of football and football players to help tackle racism in society. The majority of the organisation’s work is the delivery of education to young people and adults in their schools, their workplaces and at events held in football stadiums. Across Britain, Show Racism the Red Card delivers training to more than 50,000 individuals per year.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive and much needed annual event?

Because there is a rise in hate crimes in the UK, more needs to be done on it. Hate crime is massively unreported. For example, Show Racism the Red Card research shows that only around 10% of hate crimes is reported to the police. So therefore, we think No2H8 Crime Awards are a great way to get more people involved in reporting hate crime.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

Show Racism the Red Card and many other organisations have evidence that it is certainly rising.

  • How important is education in tackling hate crimes?

If we want to reduce hate crime in the long-term, education is key to do so. The ethos of our organisation is that no one is born racist, people learn to be racist and if you can learn to be racist you can also unlearn it.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

Everyone wants to live in a peaceful society, where everyone can go about their everyday life without harassment and therefore we need to be proactive in fighting hate crimes, put more effort into educating people and organise events such as No2H8 Crime Awards.

Wandsworth & Westminster MIND Support the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are honoured to partner on the No2H8 Crime Awards with Wandsworth & Westminster Mind. They have been delivering services and support for people living in Wandsworth and Westminster and in neighbouring boroughs for over 40 years. Their aim is to help people in local communities to have better mental health and well-being and to live the best lives possible.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

The No2H8 Awards are a positive event as they raise awareness about hate crimes in our community and bring together people who work tirelessly to decrease and ultimately eradicate this problem.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

Working together helps us by pooling information, expertise and resources as we do through CATCH (Community Alliance to Combat Hate) project.

In addition, by working together, we give a clear message that we will continue to bring people who represent diverse communities together. We give a message that we work together to facilitate harmony, understanding, mutual respect and dialogue, by emphasizing the common values of different cultures and religions. Our message is that we enjoy our differences, while respecting the others.

  • What is the main difficulty with tackling disability and mental health hate crimes?

The main difficulty has been impact of disability and mental health on people’s ability and willingness to pursue their achievable goals and cases as far as a complaint to the Police and subsequent possible prosecutions.

In addition to this, further detrimental impact on people’s mental health and increased vulnerability that limits willingness and ability to join services in community.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

To continue to raise awareness of the existence of the hate crime problem and of the necessity to overcome it.  While it is encouraging that people are more confident in coming forward to report hate crimes and that attitudes are changing for the better, even one hate crime is one too many.

‘Kick It Out’ Highlight Why They Are Part of the No2H8 Crime Annual Awards

We are honoured to have ‘Kick It Out’ as one of our partners for No2H8 Crime Awards. ‘Kick It Out’ is an organisation working on equality and inclusion through the medium of football. It also works within the educational sector to challenge discrimination, encourage inclusive practices and campaign for positive change.

  • Why do you think the No2H8 Crime Awards are a positive annual event?

‘Kick It Out’ believes that it is important to recognise the groups and individuals who take a stand against hate crime and promote messages of unity and inclusion within their communities.

Therefore, the National No2H8 Crime Awards are an essential mechanism to display the support for groups and individuals who challenge hate, but to also inspire others to recognise and promote diversity and inclusion within their local community.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

‘Kick It Out’ is aware of the many pieces of research which have indicated that hatred and intolerance are on the rise in the United Kingdom. In recognition of this, ‘Kick It Out’ launched a season long initiative called ‘Call Full Time On Hate’ which raised awareness of hate entering the game as well as promoting the inclusive work football and clubs are doing.

We believe that the only way to combat hate is to continually promote the good work being done to promote inclusion, as well as highlight areas of discrimination which need to be challenged.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

It is essential that groups continue to work together to share experiences of hate crime across the country.

Through shared experiences, we can find common ground on what is the best practices with dealing with hate as well as encouraging a warm and welcoming environment for people for all walks of life.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

As we have seen in recent times, it is vital that communities remain united so they can remain vigilant against all prejudice which may occur within their environment.

It is the same for football where ‘Kick It Out’, alongside the football authorities, must stay vigilant to any discrimination which rises in the stands or in the grassroots game.

Adrian Chiles, Presenting the No2H8 Crime Awards in October

We are pleased to announce that British TV and radio presenter, Adrian Chiles will be compering on the night for the annual #No2H8 Crime awards.

Adrian Chiles began his television and broadcasting career with a three week work experience stint at the BBC.  He can now count more than 20 years in the industry with highlights including his award winning BBC Radio Five Live programme, Chiles on Saturday, BBC TV’s Working LunchThe Apprentice:  You’re FiredMOTD2 and The One Show, and ITV’s Daybreak and football coverage.  In recent productions for the BBC, he explored his own and others’ faith in a three part series, My Mediterranean;  went back to his roots for Panorama to discover why Britain voted for Brexit;  and looked back at an extraordinary game of football in BBC 2’s Whites vs Blacks:  How Football Changed a Nation.  He can be heard regularly on BBC Radio Five where he presents Five Live Dailytwo days a week.

We are honoured to have Adrian on the night with us for what will be a celebration of the vast amount of volunteering and work that takes place in communities to counter hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

Member of the public and organisations can make nominations through the following LINK.

Judging Panel for the #No2H8 Crime National Awards Comes Together

We are pleased to announce the first appointments for the Judging Panel for the #No2H8 Crime National Awards. The appointments include:

Nazir Afzal OBE: Mr Nazir Afzal OBE is Chief Executive of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners. Nazir became Chief Crown Prosecutor for North West England in 2011 leading teams responsible for some of the highest profile cases in the country, including the child grooming case in Rochdale and the prosecution of Stuart Hall.

Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE, QC: Alex Carlile was born in Wales in 1948. After education at Epsom College he graduated LLB AKC at King’s College London. Lord Carlile was called to the Bar by Gray’s Inn (where he is now a Bencher) in 1970 and became a Q.C. in 1984, at the age of 36. Until 2009 he was the Honorary Recorder of the City of Hereford. He sits as a Recorder of the Crown Court, as a Deputy High Court Judge, and as a Chairman of the Competition Appeal Tribunal. Between 2001-2011, he was the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation; the Independent Reviewer of the Government’s new PREVENT policy and remains the independent reviewer of National Security policy in Northern Ireland.

Canon Mark Oakley: Canon Oakley was born in Shrewsbury in 1968 and was educated in London and Oxford. He was ordained at St Paul’s in 1993 and served his first appointment as Curate of St John’s Wood Church (1993-6). He was then asked to become the Chaplain to the Bishop of London (1996-2000) and was later appointed Rector of St Paul’s, Covent Garden, known as “the Actors’ church” (2000-5). He was also Chaplain at RADA from 2003 to 2005. He was subsequently invited to take up appointment as Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe, based in Copenhagen. Canon Oakley returned to London in 2008 and served at Grosvenor Chapel, Mayfair, before being appointed to St Paul’s. He is also a Deputy Priest in Ordinary to HM the Queen (1996-). Canon Oakley’s interests are the relationship between faith and poetry, human rights and the place of faith in the contemporary world. He is the author of several books and is a regular lecturer and broadcaster.

Baroness Neuberger DBE: Baroness Neuberger DBE was educated at Newnham College, Cambridge and Leo Baeck College, London.

She became a rabbi in 1977, and served the South London Liberal Synagogue for twelve years, before going to the King’s Fund Institute as a Visiting Fellow. She was at Harvard Medical School in 1991-1992, Chairman of Camden & Islington Community Health Services NHS Trust from 1993 until 1997 and then Chief Executive of the King’s Fund, an independent health charity until 2004. She has been a member of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, the Medical Research Council and the General Medical Council, a Trustee of the Runnymede Trust and the Imperial War Museum (until 2006).

She was created a Life Peer in June 2004 (Liberal Democrat) and was  Bloomberg Professor of Divinity at Harvard University for the Spring Semester 2006.

Further appointments will be announced soon.

Opening Nominations for the #No2H8Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017

We are opening nominations for the national #No2H8 Crime Awards on the 1st of May 2017. This will be the second year where we will be recognising many of the unsung heroes who work tirelessly and diligently in communities tackling hatred, prejudice and intolerance.

This year, the #No2H8 Crime Awards will host a gala dinner in London for participants and for nominees. This expands our work from last year and we have a number of high profile individuals who will be part of the Judging Panel for the awards and who will also speak at the gala dinner. Last year, the awards attracted the Under-Secretary of State for the Department for Communities and Local Government, Lord Nick Bourne and Home Office Minister, Baron Susan Williams.

If you know of an individual, organisation, Parliamentarian or social activist who has made a real difference in their local area tackling hatred, racism and prejudice, you can lodge a nomination on the #No2H8 Crime Awards site. 1st of May is the date to remember and let’s ensure that we put hate crime on the political and social map as much as possible.

Richard Benson Appointed to Chair the National #No2H8 Crime Awards

We are very pleased to announce the appointment of ex-CST Chief Executive, Richard Benson, as the Chair of the national #No2H8 Crime Awards which will be taking place in October 2017. This is an ongoing appointment and we welcome the expertise on offer through this appointment.

Following on from the successful launch of the anti-Hate Crime Awards in 2016 which attracted over 40 organisations and over 300 people, Faith Matters is proud to announce the appointment of Richard Benson as the Chair of the national awards scheme for 2017. Themed as ‘Communities Countering Hatred‘ the national awards scheme will celebrate and honour those civil society activists, religious leaders, organisations and politicians who have inspired others and worked to reduce hatred, intolerance and prejudice in their local communities.
 
This initiative is the only national awards ceremony which ensures that those working in the fields of hate crime monitoring, community cohesion and integration are honoured in the United Kingdom. The scheme therefore covers England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In 2017, there will be over 15 categories of nominations celebrating the work of young people through to organisations and faith leaders and at a time of global change and insecurity, the awards are also meant to provide a focal point to mobilise and motivate communities to be ‘Upstanders’ against hatred within communities.
 
Speaking about his appointment as Chair of the national awards scheme, the ex-CEO of the Community Security Trust, Richard Benson, said:
“I have devoted over 20 years of my professional and private life to combating anti-semitism and all forms of hate crimes and have worked with amazing people and organisations who are at the sharp end of countering the same issues. They stand up for what’s right and with so much intolerance and hatred these brave people need to be honoured openly and proudly for what they do”.