Show Racism the Red Card Become Partners With the No2H8 Crime Awards

We are proud to have ‘Show Racism the Red Card’ as our partners in the No2H8 Crime Awards. They are one of the leading anti-racism educational charities in the UK which was established in January 1996. The organisation utilises the high-profile status of football and football players to help tackle racism in society. The majority of the organisation’s work is the delivery of education to young people and adults in their schools, their workplaces and at events held in football stadiums. Across Britain, Show Racism the Red Card delivers training to more than 50,000 individuals per year.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive and much needed annual event?

Because there is a rise in hate crimes in the UK, more needs to be done on it. Hate crime is massively unreported. For example, Show Racism the Red Card research shows that only around 10% of hate crimes is reported to the police. So therefore, we think No2H8 Crime Awards are a great way to get more people involved in reporting hate crime.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

Show Racism the Red Card and many other organisations have evidence that it is certainly rising.

  • How important is education in tackling hate crimes?

If we want to reduce hate crime in the long-term, education is key to do so. The ethos of our organisation is that no one is born racist, people learn to be racist and if you can learn to be racist you can also unlearn it.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

Everyone wants to live in a peaceful society, where everyone can go about their everyday life without harassment and therefore we need to be proactive in fighting hate crimes, put more effort into educating people and organise events such as No2H8 Crime Awards.

The Anti-Bullying Alliance Partners with the No2H8 Crime Awards

Another organisation that we have partnered with on the No2H8 Crime Awards is the Anti-Bullying Alliance. It is a unique coalition of organisations and individuals, working together on preventing bullying and creating safer environments in which children and young people can live, grow, play and learn. The Anti-Bullying Alliance was established by the NSPCC and the National Children’s Bureau and they offer expertise in relation to all forms of bullying between children and young people.

  • Why do you think No2H8 Crime Awards is a positive annual event?

It draws attention to the issue of hate crime from a positive angle that celebrate those who challenge this behaviour. We hope this will in turn encourage people to report hate crime and hate incidents and prevent hate crimes happening in the future. Our collective power all saying ‘no, we will not stand for this and here is what you can do’ will empower others. We have collective power and responsibility to make sure we create a community where we have equal rights and equal respect.

  • Do you believe that hatred and intolerance are rising?

From our perspective of working with schools, we know that headway has been made over the past couple of decades to reduce hate speech in the classroom. However, recently there have been several reports that show a sharp rise in hate crimes and incidents in schools and these figures back up what we have been hearing from schools in recent years. The Anti-Bullying Alliance wants to see more awareness and support for schools on challenging discriminatory language and hate crimes and incidents in school.

  • Why is it important for groups to work together and be seen working together?

At the Anti-Bullying Alliance, our tagline is ‘United Against Bullying’. As a membership organisation ourselves, we constantly see the greater value and impact of working collaboratively. Working together means that voices from across communities are heard, messages are amplified. And ultimately that means that change can take place.

  • Why is it essential for communities to maintain vigilance against hatred, intolerance and prejudice?

We know the power for in instances of bullying of a bystander speaking up. Research in the USA in the noughties showed that in 90% of bullying situations, where a bystander [someone who sees but is not directly involved in bullying] just says ‘no’ to the situation and voices their dislike, the bullying stops. This shows the power we have to stop hate and prejudice.

The theme for this year’s Anti-Bullying Week is “All Different, All Equal”. Young people told us that their top concerns were about bullying related to differences – that of race, faith, disability, and sexuality and gender. It’s clear that they recognise negative discourse around them, but they want this to change. At a time of division, young people are telling us that they would like us to focus on the positive aspects of difference, and on finding out what links people from different walks of life.

We want to support communities to celebrate what makes them, and others, unique and help them understand why it’s important that every child feels included and is able to be themselves without fear.

Endorsements from Leading Politicians on the National Hate Crime Awards

Statement from Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government

lord-bourne-1“Nobody in Britain should live in fear because of who they are, what they believe or who they choose to love.

The Government is committed to tackling hate crime and this is why we have published a new Hate Crime Action plan to focus on reducing incidents, increasing reporting and improving support for victims.

However, it is the important work of Tell MAMA and other organisations supporting tonight’s event that make this possible in their work tackling prejudice with people from all backgrounds.

It is essential that each of us rejects hatred, offering instead empathy and support to victims of hate crime.

This evening’s launch of the National Hate Crime Awards is an opportunity to honour the remarkable individuals who are leading the fight against hate crime and I am delighted to offer my support. “


Statement from the Right Honourable Nick Clegg MP

nick-clegg-mp“The National Hate Crime Awards are hugely important to honour the tireless and selfless work that so many do across the country to challenge intolerance. We have recently seen rises in hate crimes across the UK yet the cornerstone of our country is based on protecting the dignity and identities of people so that they are not targeted out of hatred, intolerance and prejudice. I stand by these core values and that is why we must honour those in our communities who stand up against such intolerant behaviour.”


Statement from Alison Saunders CB, Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP)  at the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS)

alison-saunders“The CPS is delighted to support the first National Hate Crime Awards.

The CPS is committed to doing all it can to improve awareness of hate crime, increase the reporting of these corrosive crimes and raise confidence in the prosecution process.

Celebrating the achievements of those at the forefront of effective change, to the benefit of all communities, plays a central role in pursuit of this objective.”

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